In Summary:
– The site is especially good for light day camping and team-building activities. Local guides will first lead you across the river.
– At the base, the river fans out into a small, foaming gorge. And it becomes impossible to talk to your closest neighbour over the deafening roar of the water.
– The scenery around the falls is picturesque. Overhanging branches nod gently in the breeze. Birds flit from tree to tree, having the time of their lives.

‘When I looked up and gazed at the fascinating falls…” That was probably how Theodore Roosevelt, former president of the United States, recorded the experience of his first sight of the Fourteen Falls.

In his adventurous streak, he had made a similar statement in reference to the Great Rainbow Bridge in Utah.

Just a short walk off the Thika-Garissa road, this hidden gem was worth an addition to his itinerary to Lord Macmillan’s Castle at Ol Donyo Sabuk in 1911.

Now, in their centennial since that visit, these falls on River Athi still command a breathtaking view.

But, whoever, referred to them as falls did not do them justice. Cataracts, is a better term. For a place with almost 100 metres of width, and water plunging from the height of a one-storey building, a waterfall would be too demeaning a title.

Anyhow, the falls are one of Kenya’s most spectacular landmarks. There is a rich recipe of activities to do here, all at subsidised rates.

The site is especially good for light day camping and team-building activities. Local guides will first lead you across the river. Then you come down around huge boulders and find you are looking up at a gigantic, 25-metre ledge.

At the base, the river fans out into a small, foaming gorge. And it becomes impossible to talk to your closest neighbour over the deafening roar of the water.

Suddenly, you contemplate something like a wounded bird against the velvet blue sky. Then you hold your breath as a daredevil plunges into the swelling pool below.

From here, you can ride a boat smoothly down the channel, with an imposing view of Kilimambogo to the southeast.

The scenery around the falls is picturesque. Overhanging branches nod gently in the breeze. Birds flit from tree to tree, having the time of their lives.

The aesthetic pleasure provided by the falls is not all about the visual. It is also of religious significance to the people. For example, Asians use it as a shrine. They are believed to pour the ash of cremated people in the river in the belief that it will go all the way to India through the Indian Ocean.

When you are replete with your discoveries, you can have your lunch under the shade of a mugumo tree.

The Kiambu County Government, which manages this site, carries out regular cleaning and garbage collection.