In Summary:
– The tests were conducted at the Rift Valley Provincial General Hospital.
– He said legal action will be taken against the company, based in Nakuru’s industrial area, if it is found culpable.
– This is not an unknown thing by the Chinese, this is why they are being kicked out of Zambia and other area’s for using poison and other chemicals that kills the water, soil and more. In the end it is the local population that will suffer, get sick or whats worse.

A Chinese battery manufacturer based in Nakuru is being investigated after blood samples of its former employees tested positive for lead poisoning.

The Nakuru County Public Health Department said it was investigating the Xiangui International Battery factory, which also deals with lead smelting after blood samples for the former workers revealed high lead deposits.

The tests were conducted at the Rift Valley Provincial General Hospital.

Public Health Officer Samuel King’ori said the eight employees were allegedly sacked after they started ailing.

“I have received complaints from the eight former workers and their claims were backed by residents and area leaders,” said Mr Kimani.

Mr King’ori said blood samples were taken from the affected workers for further tests by the Government Chemist and results would be out in two weeks.

“The county government will also pay for independent analyses by a private entity,” said Mr King’ori.

He said legal action will be taken against the company, based in Nakuru’s industrial area, if it is found culpable.

Area ward Representative Francis Njoroge, who previously worked for the firm, has also raised concerns about the operations of the factory.

China isn’t alone in looking to Africa for fuel and treasure, but its relentless push for development has placed a serious strain on weak African governments with little capacity for oversight — which are now starting to discover that Chinese aid comes with its own complications.

Impoverished Chad, for instance, has welcomed exploration of Chad’s oil reserves by Chinese companies (along with American and British ones). But promises to use the oil revenues to raise Chad’s standard of living have largely gone unmet, while pollution from drilling sites and other oil-related infrastructure damages the air and water of the country.

Thus, last month’s order by the Chadian government to suspend work by China National Petroleum on the basis of its environmental damage marks a milestone — an African nation pushing back against the Chinese approach to development. In a letter obtained by Agence France Presse, officials demanded that the Chinese oil giant pay $1.2 billion for illegal dumping and for filling in polluted drilling sites without first treating them for toxic residue. The same company was suspended last year for environmental violations, but not subjected to a fine. Chad’s willingness to put some teeth into its environmental protections should reverberate by the East African countries and throughout Africa and beyond.

If no action is taken, the African continent will go from being one of the richest in minerals, land and more to be bare from the misuse from severely bad business-men and countries.